Amazing reflective article

CNN Belief Blog

Editor’s Note: Tanya Marie (“T.M.”) Luhrmann is a psychological anthropologist and the Watkins University professor in the department of anthropology at Stanford University in Stanford, California. She is the author of “When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God.”

By T.M. Luhrmann, Special to CNN

(CNN)—In the Bible, God spoke directly to Abraham. He spoke directly to Moses. He spoke directly to Job. But to your neighbor down the street?

Most people reading the ancient scriptures understand these accounts of hearing God’s voice as miracles that really did happen but no longer take place today, or maybe as folkloric flourishes to ancient stories. Even Christians who believe that miracles can be an everyday affair can hesitate when someone tells them they heard God speak audibly. There’s an old joke: When you talk to God, we call it prayer, but when God talks to…

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Egyptian Policy Appears Unchanged

Egyptian Policy Appears Unchanged

This conflict will continue to grow more toxic until Morsi decides to focus less on security and more on justice.

Ever since the coming to power of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Israeli officials have been pointing out the increased radicalization of the region. The harsh anti-Israeli language that Egyptian president, Mohamed Morsi, has been making in the wake of the recent crisis is seen in Israel as a clear sign that the post-Arab Spring Middle East is presenting them with a new set of challenge.

Mubarak with a Beard?

Mubarak with a Beard?

Reflecting on the lessons of the Arab uprisings in November 2011, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was adamant that traditional U.S. policies in the region were no longer tenable. “[A]s the fall of Hosni Mubarak in Egypt made clear,” she said “the enduring cooperation we seek will be difficult to sustain without democratic legitimacy and public consent.” But such revelations necessitate drastic changes, and in the face of unanticipated events and crises, it’s all too easy for the familiar policies of the past to re-emerge. As Egypt descends again into turmoil over the country’s fraught constitution-writing process, it appears that the United States is once again embracing the past and eschewing the lessons it learned the hard way during the uprising.